Rev William Keble Martin (1877–1969)


Keble Martin was the grandson of Dr George Moberly, headmaster of Winchester and later Bishop of Salisbury. He was brother to architect Arthur Campbell Martin (1875-1963) and was also connected to John Keble of the Oxford Movement. His father was appointed as the Rector of Dartington, near Totnes, when William was 14 years old.
 
He was educated at Marlborough, and went up to Christ Church, Oxford in 1896 to read Greek Philosophy and Botany. He trained for the church at Cuddesdon Theological College. After ordination, he worked in industrial parishes in the north and Midlands (one of these was Wath-upon-Dearne, the subject of his first book) and, in the First World War, as a chaplain in France. In 1921 he was offered the benefice of Haccombe and Coffinswell in Devon and in 1934 became the incumbent at Great Torrington. (He was the Archpriest of Haccombe and Rector of Coffinswell.) Keble Martin saw a vision of a new church in a dream, and his brother architect transformed the dream into reality - now a listed building, St Luke the Evangelist Church at Milber, Newton Abbot is remarkable for its exceptional interior space and extraordinary plan with three angled naves, linked by arcades with granite columns, which converge on the central altar. The exterior walls are white render with a pyramidal copper-clad roof on a squat square tower. Keble Martin retired in 1949 at the age of 72, but continued to work in the church.
 
He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society in 1928, and later edited with G. T. Fraser the first volume of a comprehensive Flora of Devon (1939). The Concise British Flora was published in May 1965 when Martin was 88. The book was the result of 60 years' meticulous fieldwork and showed exquisite painting skills, and became an immediate best-seller. He completed over 1,400 paintings in colour and many black-and-white drawings before the book was finally published. In June 1966 he received an honorary degree of Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) from Exeter University. Four of his designs for an issue of wild flower stamps were accepted by the Royal Mail and issued in April 1967. He published his autobiography, Over the Hills, shortly before he died in 1969 at the age of 92 at Woodbury.

Content courtesy of Wikipedia

Rev William Keble Martin (1877–1969)


Keble Martin was the grandson of Dr George Moberly, headmaster of Winchester and later Bishop of Salisbury. He was brother to architect Arthur Campbell Martin (1875-1963) and was also connected to John Keble of the Oxford Movement. His father was appointed as the Rector of Dartington, near Totnes, when William was 14 years old.
 
He was educated at Marlborough, and went up to Christ Church, Oxford in 1896 to read Greek Philosophy and Botany. He trained for the church at Cuddesdon Theological College. After ordination, he worked in industrial parishes in the north and Midlands (one of these was Wath-upon-Dearne, the subject of his first book) and, in the First World War, as a chaplain in France. In 1921 he was offered the benefice of Haccombe and Coffinswell in Devon and in 1934 became the incumbent at Great Torrington. (He was the Archpriest of Haccombe and Rector of Coffinswell.) Keble Martin saw a vision of a new church in a dream, and his brother architect transformed the dream into reality - now a listed building, St Luke the Evangelist Church at Milber, Newton Abbot is remarkable for its exceptional interior space and extraordinary plan with three angled naves, linked by arcades with granite columns, which converge on the central altar. The exterior walls are white render with a pyramidal copper-clad roof on a squat square tower. Keble Martin retired in 1949 at the age of 72, but continued to work in the church.
 
He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society in 1928, and later edited with G. T. Fraser the first volume of a comprehensive Flora of Devon (1939). The Concise British Flora was published in May 1965 when Martin was 88. The book was the result of 60 years' meticulous fieldwork and showed exquisite painting skills, and became an immediate best-seller. He completed over 1,400 paintings in colour and many black-and-white drawings before the book was finally published. In June 1966 he received an honorary degree of Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) from Exeter University. Four of his designs for an issue of wild flower stamps were accepted by the Royal Mail and issued in April 1967. He published his autobiography, Over the Hills, shortly before he died in 1969 at the age of 92 at Woodbury.

Content courtesy of Wikipedia

Rev William Keble Martin (1877–1969)


Keble Martin was the grandson of Dr George Moberly, headmaster of Winchester and later Bishop of Salisbury. He was brother to architect Arthur Campbell Martin (1875-1963) and was also connected to John Keble of the Oxford Movement. His father was appointed as the Rector of Dartington, near Totnes, when William was 14 years old.
 
He was educated at Marlborough, and went up to Christ Church, Oxford in 1896 to read Greek Philosophy and Botany. He trained for the church at Cuddesdon Theological College. After ordination, he worked in industrial parishes in the north and Midlands (one of these was Wath-upon-Dearne, the subject of his first book) and, in the First World War, as a chaplain in France. In 1921 he was offered the benefice of Haccombe and Coffinswell in Devon and in 1934 became the incumbent at Great Torrington. (He was the Archpriest of Haccombe and Rector of Coffinswell.) Keble Martin saw a vision of a new church in a dream, and his brother architect transformed the dream into reality - now a listed building, St Luke the Evangelist Church at Milber, Newton Abbot is remarkable for its exceptional interior space and extraordinary plan with three angled naves, linked by arcades with granite columns, which converge on the central altar. The exterior walls are white render with a pyramidal copper-clad roof on a squat square tower. Keble Martin retired in 1949 at the age of 72, but continued to work in the church.
 
He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society in 1928, and later edited with G. T. Fraser the first volume of a comprehensive Flora of Devon (1939). The Concise British Flora was published in May 1965 when Martin was 88. The book was the result of 60 years' meticulous fieldwork and showed exquisite painting skills, and became an immediate best-seller. He completed over 1,400 paintings in colour and many black-and-white drawings before the book was finally published. In June 1966 he received an honorary degree of Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) from Exeter University. Four of his designs for an issue of wild flower stamps were accepted by the Royal Mail and issued in April 1967. He published his autobiography, Over the Hills, shortly before he died in 1969 at the age of 92 at Woodbury.

Content courtesy of Wikipedia

Support us in conserving your local history.
14 South Street and The Market House-Great Torrington-Devon-EX388AF
Telephone - 01805 622306
Email - enquiries@torringtonmuseum.org.uk
Registered Charity 1166793
© 2016 Great Torrington Heritage Museum
Please support us in conserving your local history.
14 South Street and The Market House, Great Torrington, Devon, EX38 8AF.
Telephone - 01805 622306
Email - enquiries@torringtonmuseum.org.uk
Registered Charity 1166793
© 2016 Great Torrington Heritage Museum
Please support us in conserving your local history.
14 South Street and The Market House, Great Torrington, Devon, EX38 8AF.
Telephone - 01805 622306
Email - enquiries@torringtonmuseum.org.uk
Registered Charity 1166793
© 2016 Great Torrington Heritage Museum